“Sergen Şehitoğlu presents two years old project, called “Kill Memories”, is comprised of 15 images captured from a computer screen. These are the images of a young woman, a cam model, who contacts her customers via a webcam which, in this case, substitutes a camera. 

Concerned with the use of photograph as medium in the era we live in today, the artist sets here multiple angles for the viewer. First of all, he puts forward the nature of photography as medium. A non-traditional tool, the webcam, essentially possessed by the object of the photograph, is instrumentalized and used by the artist. Thus, the series open up a discussion about the nature of the art of photography. Another important question that the artist discusses is the form that our relations have taken with digital age. Besides, in contact for almost more than a year, between the artist and the subject, grows an odd connection here. And these photographs taken at different times during more than a year represent a special kind of virtual relationship where online life overtakes the ‘real world’ life, just like in the recent film of Spike Jones, “Her”. This connection becomes even more complicated with the fact that the woman, consciously exposing herself, is not aware that she is being part of an artistic project. Here, the boundaries between private and public become extremely blurry.

After capturing the images, Şehitoğlu processed these shots in distinct ways like deciding the frame, the blur or the colours. In a way, this series is also a new look to Thomas Ruff’s 2003 series “Nudes” where he plays on the pornographic jpegs collected on the web. Although the series “Kill Memories” is not erotic, nor pornographic; the two methods stay parallel as the virtual images are gathered via internet and then transformed into optically beautiful but contextually profound imagery.”

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Nilufer Sasmazer

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Editor & Curator

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                


“Thus, the possibility to gather, frame and work images begins to form his artistic database. These transfers and operations of images between computing systems meeting functions of compilation, formation and storage also serve his visual research. In the series, titled “Kill Memories”, a young woman, exposing her allure in front of the webcam that frames her, is totally unaware that she is at the centre of the artistic project of Sergen Şehitoğlu who has been watching her for more than a year. This age of self-documentation and distance relationship, which bends the boundaries of privacy, allows Sergen Şehitoğlu to reclaim and enlarge these captured images. Beyond content produced with a webcam, it is the plurality of gazes upon this Marilyn Monroe 2.0 that attracts artist’s attention. Amongst various poses and expectations of interaction, Sergen Şehitoğlu constructs a composite portrait where the individual multiplies, exposes herself, shows herself and duplicates. Voyeurism, self-exposure and extimacy: through the direct intervention of the public sphere, the private sphere is short-circuited. In a manner of a window-woman, this mosaic constituted of duplicated faces, reinforces the networked operation and presents us a new digital adventure of the portrait. Choosing, compiling, broadcasting or archiving our own data, each of us confronts the digital traces we exude, with or without our consent.”

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Marianne Derrien                                                                                                

Independent curator and art critic